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News & Events
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Probiotics 101: What They Are and When to Use
Probiotics are live bacteria and yeasts similar to the microorganisms that naturally live in your gut. They help promote a healthy bacteria balance in the gut by counteracting unhealthy gut bacteria from a poor diet, inflammation, antibiotics, and illnesses. Probiotics help restore the natural balance of gut bacteria.

When it comes to probiotics, scientists have discovered there’s a wide variety of different types and therefore, probiotics are differentiated by the strain of bacteria. If you’ve ever looked for a probiotic, you’ve probably been a little overwhelmed and confused with the long and complicated names. There is a good chance  you’ve said something like, “I was told to take a probiotic, but what does Lactobacillus acidophilus or  Bifidobacteria longum even mean?” 

In an effort to help simplify things, I’m sharing a few common strains of probiotics, what ailments they treat, and where to find them.  

Lactobacillus acidophilus (L. acidophilus) 

Primary Purpose: 

  • Digestion and overall general health. L. acidophilus helps break down sugars such as lactose, into lactic acid. It is also known for protecting against harmful germs. 


May also help: 

  • Reduce cholesterol 

  • Improve symptoms associated with chronic fatigue syndrome

  • Prevent or reduce diarrhea 

  • Improve symptoms of IBS 

  • Treat and prevent vaginal yeast infections

  • Boost immune system 


Found in: Naturally found in fermented foods such as sauerkraut, miso, and tempeh. Commonly added to foods such as cheese and yogurt. Can also be found in a supplement. 

Lactobacillus rhamnosus (L. rhamnosus)

Primary purpose:  

  • Prevent and treat a variety of types of diarrhea, specifically antibiotic-related diarrhea. 


May also help:

  • Relieve symptoms of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS)

  • Improve overall gut health

  • Protect against cavities due to the antimicrobial properties.


Found in: Supplements and often added to dairy products such as yogurt, cheese, and milk. 

Lactobacillus casei (L. casei)

Primary Purpose: 

  • Prevent and treat diarrhea, including infectious diarrhea, traveler’s diarrhea and diarrhea associated with taking antibiotics.  


May also help: 

  • Reduce symptoms of other digestive issues such as constipation, Crohn's disease, IBD (inflammatory bowel disease), IBS (irritable bowel syndrome) and ulcerative colitis. 


Found in: Fermented foods such as yogurt, milk, and cheese. Also found in supplements. 

Bifidobacteria longum  (B. longum) 

Primary Purpose: 

  • Boost immune system 


May also help: 

  • Decrease inflammation 

  • Decrease cholesterol 

  • Improve gut health 

  • Boost brain function 

  • Improves mood 


Found in:  Naturally found in fermented foods such as sauerkraut, yogurt, kefir, kombucha, tempeh, and miso.

Saccharomyces boulardii (S. boulardii) 

Primary Purpose: 

  • Treating rotaviral diarrhea in children and diarrhea caused by antibiotics.


May also help: 

  • Acne 

  • Diarrhea caused by “bad” bacteria overgrowth in adult

  • Traveler’s diarrhea

  • Diarrhea associated with tube feeding


Found in:  S. Boulardii is actually yeast and easiest to take in the over-the-counter supplement form. Can also be found in African fermented foods such as kenkey, ogi, and amasi.
10 Probiotic Rich Foods


  1. Yogurt

  2. Kefir

  3. Sauerkraut

  4. Water or brine-cured olives

  5. Kombucha

  6. Pickles

  7. Traditional Buttermilk

  8. Cottage Cheese

  9. Miso

  10. Tempeh

Featured Recipe
Green Goddess Dressing
Recipe by: Siggi’s
Ingredients

  • 1 cup Siggi’s 0% plain skyr

  • ½ avocado

  • 1 clove garlic, crushed

  • ½ cup parsley, roughly chopped

  • ¼ cup tarragon, roughly chopped

  • ¼ cup chives, roughly chopped

  • 3 Tbsp milk

  • 2 Tbsp extra virgin olive oil

  • 1Tbsp lemon juice

  • salt and pepper, to taste


Preparation
Combine Siggi’s skyr with remaining ingredients in a food processor or immersion blender and puree until smooth. Enjoy as a salad dressing or a dip with vegetables.

Makes 16 servings, Serving Size: 2 Tbsp

Nutrition Facts Per Serving: Calories 40, Protein 2g, Total Fat 2.5g, Saturated Fat 0g, Cholesterol 0mg, Sodium 30mg, Total Carbohydrates 2g, Sugars less than 1g
Be Inspired

“Our body teaches us that health lies in balance and harmony, rather than in conflict and fighting.” - Ilchi Lee

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News & Events
Probiotics 101: What They Are and When to Use
Probiotics are live bacteria and yeasts similar to the microorganisms that naturally live in your gut. They help promote a healthy bacteria balance in the gut by counteracting unhealthy gut bacteria from a poor diet, inflammation, antibiotics, and illnesses. Probiotics help restore the natural balance of gut bacteria.

When it comes to probiotics, scientists have discovered there’s a wide variety of different types and therefore, probiotics are differentiated by the strain of bacteria. If you’ve ever looked for a probiotic, you’ve probably been a little overwhelmed and confused with the long and complicated names. There is a good chance  you’ve said something like, “I was told to take a probiotic, but what does Lactobacillus acidophilus or  Bifidobacteria longum even mean?” 

In an effort to help simplify things, I’m sharing a few common strains of probiotics, what ailments they treat, and where to find them.  

Lactobacillus acidophilus (L. acidophilus) 

Primary Purpose: 

  • Digestion and overall general health. L. acidophilus helps break down sugars such as lactose, into lactic acid. It is also known for protecting against harmful germs. 


May also help: 

  • Reduce cholesterol 

  • Improve symptoms associated with chronic fatigue syndrome

  • Prevent or reduce diarrhea 

  • Improve symptoms of IBS 

  • Treat and prevent vaginal yeast infections

  • Boost immune system 


Found in: Naturally found in fermented foods such as sauerkraut, miso, and tempeh. Commonly added to foods such as cheese and yogurt. Can also be found in a supplement. 

Lactobacillus rhamnosus (L. rhamnosus)

Primary purpose:  

  • Prevent and treat a variety of types of diarrhea, specifically antibiotic-related diarrhea. 


May also help:

  • Relieve symptoms of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS)

  • Improve overall gut health

  • Protect against cavities due to the antimicrobial properties.


Found in: Supplements and often added to dairy products such as yogurt, cheese, and milk. 

Lactobacillus casei (L. casei)

Primary Purpose: 

  • Prevent and treat diarrhea, including infectious diarrhea, traveler’s diarrhea and diarrhea associated with taking antibiotics.  


May also help: 

  • Reduce symptoms of other digestive issues such as constipation, Crohn's disease, IBD (inflammatory bowel disease), IBS (irritable bowel syndrome) and ulcerative colitis. 


Found in: Fermented foods such as yogurt, milk, and cheese. Also found in supplements. 

Bifidobacteria longum  (B. longum) 

Primary Purpose: 

  • Boost immune system 


May also help: 

  • Decrease inflammation 

  • Decrease cholesterol 

  • Improve gut health 

  • Boost brain function 

  • Improves mood 


Found in:  Naturally found in fermented foods such as sauerkraut, yogurt, kefir, kombucha, tempeh, and miso.

Saccharomyces boulardii (S. boulardii) 

Primary Purpose: 

  • Treating rotaviral diarrhea in children and diarrhea caused by antibiotics.


May also help: 

  • Acne 

  • Diarrhea caused by “bad” bacteria overgrowth in adult

  • Traveler’s diarrhea

  • Diarrhea associated with tube feeding


Found in:  S. Boulardii is actually yeast and easiest to take in the over-the-counter supplement form. Can also be found in African fermented foods such as kenkey, ogi, and amasi.
10 Probiotic Rich Foods


  1. Yogurt

  2. Kefir

  3. Sauerkraut

  4. Water or brine-cured olives

  5. Kombucha

  6. Pickles

  7. Traditional Buttermilk

  8. Cottage Cheese

  9. Miso

  10. Tempeh

Featured Recipe
Green Goddess Dressing
Recipe by: Siggi’s
Ingredients

  • 1 cup Siggi’s 0% plain skyr

  • ½ avocado

  • 1 clove garlic, crushed

  • ½ cup parsley, roughly chopped

  • ¼ cup tarragon, roughly chopped

  • ¼ cup chives, roughly chopped

  • 3 Tbsp milk

  • 2 Tbsp extra virgin olive oil

  • 1Tbsp lemon juice

  • salt and pepper, to taste


Preparation
Combine Siggi’s skyr with remaining ingredients in a food processor or immersion blender and puree until smooth. Enjoy as a salad dressing or a dip with vegetables.

Makes 16 servings, Serving Size: 2 Tbsp

Nutrition Facts Per Serving: Calories 40, Protein 2g, Total Fat 2.5g, Saturated Fat 0g, Cholesterol 0mg, Sodium 30mg, Total Carbohydrates 2g, Sugars less than 1g
Be Inspired

“Our body teaches us that health lies in balance and harmony, rather than in conflict and fighting.” - Ilchi Lee

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Probiotics 101: What They Are and When to Use
Probiotics are live bacteria and yeasts similar to the microorganisms that naturally live in your gut. They help promote a healthy bacteria balance in the gut by counteracting unhealthy gut bacteria from a poor diet, inflammation, antibiotics, and illnesses. Probiotics help restore the natural balance of gut bacteria.

When it comes to probiotics, scientists have discovered there’s a wide variety of different types and therefore, probiotics are differentiated by the strain of bacteria. If you’ve ever looked for a probiotic, you’ve probably been a little overwhelmed and confused with the long and complicated names. There is a good chance  you’ve said something like, “I was told to take a probiotic, but what does Lactobacillus acidophilus or  Bifidobacteria longum even mean?” 

In an effort to help simplify things, I’m sharing a few common strains of probiotics, what ailments they treat, and where to find them.  

Lactobacillus acidophilus (L. acidophilus) 

Primary Purpose: 

  • Digestion and overall general health. L. acidophilus helps break down sugars such as lactose, into lactic acid. It is also known for protecting against harmful germs. 


May also help: 

  • Reduce cholesterol 

  • Improve symptoms associated with chronic fatigue syndrome

  • Prevent or reduce diarrhea 

  • Improve symptoms of IBS 

  • Treat and prevent vaginal yeast infections

  • Boost immune system 


Found in: Naturally found in fermented foods such as sauerkraut, miso, and tempeh. Commonly added to foods such as cheese and yogurt. Can also be found in a supplement. 

Lactobacillus rhamnosus (L. rhamnosus)

Primary purpose:  

  • Prevent and treat a variety of types of diarrhea, specifically antibiotic-related diarrhea. 


May also help:

  • Relieve symptoms of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS)

  • Improve overall gut health

  • Protect against cavities due to the antimicrobial properties.


Found in: Supplements and often added to dairy products such as yogurt, cheese, and milk. 

Lactobacillus casei (L. casei)

Primary Purpose: 

  • Prevent and treat diarrhea, including infectious diarrhea, traveler’s diarrhea and diarrhea associated with taking antibiotics.  


May also help: 

  • Reduce symptoms of other digestive issues such as constipation, Crohn's disease, IBD (inflammatory bowel disease), IBS (irritable bowel syndrome) and ulcerative colitis. 


Found in: Fermented foods such as yogurt, milk, and cheese. Also found in supplements. 

Bifidobacteria longum  (B. longum) 

Primary Purpose: 

  • Boost immune system 


May also help: 

  • Decrease inflammation 

  • Decrease cholesterol 

  • Improve gut health 

  • Boost brain function 

  • Improves mood 


Found in:  Naturally found in fermented foods such as sauerkraut, yogurt, kefir, kombucha, tempeh, and miso.

Saccharomyces boulardii (S. boulardii) 

Primary Purpose: 

  • Treating rotaviral diarrhea in children and diarrhea caused by antibiotics.


May also help: 

  • Acne 

  • Diarrhea caused by “bad” bacteria overgrowth in adult

  • Traveler’s diarrhea

  • Diarrhea associated with tube feeding


Found in:  S. Boulardii is actually yeast and easiest to take in the over-the-counter supplement form. Can also be found in African fermented foods such as kenkey, ogi, and amasi.
10 Probiotic Rich Foods


  1. Yogurt

  2. Kefir

  3. Sauerkraut

  4. Water or brine-cured olives

  5. Kombucha

  6. Pickles

  7. Traditional Buttermilk

  8. Cottage Cheese

  9. Miso

  10. Tempeh

Featured Recipe
Green Goddess Dressing
Recipe by: Siggi’s
Ingredients

  • 1 cup Siggi’s 0% plain skyr

  • ½ avocado

  • 1 clove garlic, crushed

  • ½ cup parsley, roughly chopped

  • ¼ cup tarragon, roughly chopped

  • ¼ cup chives, roughly chopped

  • 3 Tbsp milk

  • 2 Tbsp extra virgin olive oil

  • 1Tbsp lemon juice

  • salt and pepper, to taste


Preparation
Combine Siggi’s skyr with remaining ingredients in a food processor or immersion blender and puree until smooth. Enjoy as a salad dressing or a dip with vegetables.

Makes 16 servings, Serving Size: 2 Tbsp

Nutrition Facts Per Serving: Calories 40, Protein 2g, Total Fat 2.5g, Saturated Fat 0g, Cholesterol 0mg, Sodium 30mg, Total Carbohydrates 2g, Sugars less than 1g
Be Inspired
“Our body teaches us that health lies in balance and harmony, rather than in conflict and fighting.” - Ilchi Lee
Copyright © 2019 Customized Nutrition Newsletters, All rights reserved.
Customize the look and feel of your newsletter

Font Style

Header Font Style
Body Font Style

Color Scheme

Newsletter Background Color
 
Header Underline Color
 
Font Header Color
Font Color
Link Color
 
Probiotics 101: What They Are and When to Use

Probiotics are live bacteria and yeasts similar to the microorganisms that naturally live in your gut. They help promote a healthy bacteria balance in the gut by counteracting unhealthy gut bacteria from a poor diet, inflammation, antibiotics, and illnesses. Probiotics help restore the natural balance of gut bacteria.

When it comes to probiotics, scientists have discovered there’s a wide variety of different types and therefore, probiotics are differentiated by the strain of bacteria. If you’ve ever looked for a probiotic, you’ve probably been a little overwhelmed and confused with the long and complicated names. There is a good chance  you’ve said something like, “I was told to take a probiotic, but what does Lactobacillus acidophilus or  Bifidobacteria longum even mean?” 

In an effort to help simplify things, I’m sharing a few common strains of probiotics, what ailments they treat, and where to find them.  

Lactobacillus acidophilus (L. acidophilus) 

Primary Purpose: 


  • Digestion and overall general health. L. acidophilus helps break down sugars such as lactose, into lactic acid. It is also known for protecting against harmful germs. 


May also help: 

  • Reduce cholesterol 

  • Improve symptoms associated with chronic fatigue syndrome

  • Prevent or reduce diarrhea 

  • Improve symptoms of IBS 

  • Treat and prevent vaginal yeast infections

  • Boost immune system 


Found in: Naturally found in fermented foods such as sauerkraut, miso, and tempeh. Commonly added to foods such as cheese and yogurt. Can also be found in a supplement. 

Lactobacillus rhamnosus (L. rhamnosus)

Primary purpose:  

  • Prevent and treat a variety of types of diarrhea, specifically antibiotic-related diarrhea. 


May also help:

  • Relieve symptoms of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS)

  • Improve overall gut health

  • Protect against cavities due to the antimicrobial properties.


Found in: Supplements and often added to dairy products such as yogurt, cheese, and milk. 

Lactobacillus casei (L. casei)

Primary Purpose: 

  • Prevent and treat diarrhea, including infectious diarrhea, traveler’s diarrhea and diarrhea associated with taking antibiotics.  


May also help: 

  • Reduce symptoms of other digestive issues such as constipation, Crohn's disease, IBD (inflammatory bowel disease), IBS (irritable bowel syndrome) and ulcerative colitis. 


Found in: Fermented foods such as yogurt, milk, and cheese. Also found in supplements. 

Bifidobacteria longum  (B. longum) 

Primary Purpose: 

  • Boost immune system 


May also help: 

  • Decrease inflammation 

  • Decrease cholesterol 

  • Improve gut health 

  • Boost brain function 

  • Improves mood 


Found in:  Naturally found in fermented foods such as sauerkraut, yogurt, kefir, kombucha, tempeh, and miso.

Saccharomyces boulardii (S. boulardii) 

Primary Purpose: 

  • Treating rotaviral diarrhea in children and diarrhea caused by antibiotics.


May also help: 

  • Acne 

  • Diarrhea caused by “bad” bacteria overgrowth in adult

  • Traveler’s diarrhea

  • Diarrhea associated with tube feeding


Found in:  S. Boulardii is actually yeast and easiest to take in the over-the-counter supplement form. Can also be found in African fermented foods such as kenkey, ogi, and amasi.

Featured Recipe
Green Goddess Dressing

Recipe by: Siggi’s
Ingredients


  • 1 cup Siggi’s 0% plain skyr

  • ½ avocado

  • 1 clove garlic, crushed

  • ½ cup parsley, roughly chopped

  • ¼ cup tarragon, roughly chopped

  • ¼ cup chives, roughly chopped

  • 3 Tbsp milk

  • 2 Tbsp extra virgin olive oil

  • 1Tbsp lemon juice

  • salt and pepper, to taste


Preparation
Combine Siggi’s skyr with remaining ingredients in a food processor or immersion blender and puree until smooth. Enjoy as a salad dressing or a dip with vegetables.

Makes 16 servings, Serving Size: 2 Tbsp

Nutrition Facts Per Serving: Calories 40, Protein 2g, Total Fat 2.5g, Saturated Fat 0g, Cholesterol 0mg, Sodium 30mg, Total Carbohydrates 2g, Sugars less than 1g

Be Inspired
“Our body teaches us that health lies in balance and harmony, rather than in conflict and fighting.” - Ilchi Lee
10 Probiotic Rich Foods


  1. Yogurt

  2. Kefir

  3. Sauerkraut

  4. Water or brine-cured olives

  5. Kombucha

  6. Pickles

  7. Traditional Buttermilk

  8. Cottage Cheese

  9. Miso

  10. Tempeh

Copyright © 2019 Customized Nutrition Newsletters, All rights reserved.
Customize the look and feel of your newsletter

Font Style

Header Font Style
Body Font Style

Color Scheme

Newsletter Background Color
 
Right Column Background Color
 
About Background Color
 
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Header Underline Color
 
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